DENOSA urges potential student nurses to beware of bogus nursing colleges...

Media statement

Thursday, 15 January 2015

As matriculants of 2014 are currently making up the long queues around the country’s institutions of higher learning for a space to enroll, the Democratic Nursing Organisation of South Africa (DENOSA) would like to urge those who will be pursuing a career in nursing to be extremely careful of fly-by-night nursing colleges this time of the year as they plan to take advantage of desperate students who are looking for placement.

Bogus nursing colleges are a normal feature during this time, which offer training that is not assessed and accredited by the South African Nursing Council (SANC), which is a regulatory body for nursing in the country. Any nursing institution that is not accredited by SANC or a training programme offered by such institution to student nurses are not regarded as legitimate institutions and programmes.

Even if an institution is accredited, each and every programme offered to students must also be accredited, or else such students won’t be able to practice as nurses in South Africa upon completion of their studies.

DENOSA would like to caution about the long process it takes for such institutions to reimburse students their monies when it is discovered by law enforcement agencies. The repayment process is so long that a student may not be able enroll at any other accredited institution in the same year, as closing dates would ordinarily have long passed.

Potential nursing students and their parents should first check with the South African Nursing Council (SANC) if the nursing institution they intend to study at is accredited by visiting www.sanc.co.za or call SANC call centre on 012 420 1000. SANC has a list of all accredited nursing institutions in each province, both public and private.

DENOSA would like to encourage those young people with a passion for caring and nursing to pursue a career in the profession, as the country is experiencing a shortage of nurses. The average age of a nurse in South Africa is over 40 years, which is an indication that nurses nearing retirement are in the majority in the profession. 

End 

Issued by the Democratic Nursing Organisation of South Africa (DENOSA)

For more information, contact:

Simon Hlungwani, DENOSA President

Mobile: 079 501 4922

Or

Sibongiseni Delihlazo, DENOSA Communications Manager

Mobile: 079 875 2663

Tel: 012 343 2315

Email: sibongisenid@denosa.org.za

Website: www.denosa.org.za

Facebook: DENOSA National Page

Twitter: @DENOSAORG       

Read more
DENOSA’s message this festive season: Drive safely because there are few health workers in the country...

Media statement

Thursday, 18 December 2014

The Democratic Nursing Organisation of South Africa (DENOSA) would like to urge fellow South Africans to travel safely these December holidays once again, and rest whenever they get tired as it may happen that the areas they travel along have shortage of health workers such as nurses.

Accidents increase on the outskirts of big towns and cities due to high traffic volume as people leave for their homes in rural areas for December holidays. December holidays always increase both nurse-to-patient and doctor-to-patient ratios considerably in rural hospitals and clinics as majority citizens flock to these areas for their summer vacation.

DENOSA’s concern is that, because injury is one of the leading causes of deaths in the country mainly because of accidents, the situations at ICU facilities especially those in rural areas become dire during these times of high-peak volumes. While ICU nurse-to-patient ratios must be one nurse for every patient, the vacancy rates at ICU remain a challenge for many hospitals to such that an ICU of 20 beds may have only 10 nurses, which increases risks of losing lives.

December holidays exacerbate matters and increase the risks of losing more lives as emergency admissions due to injuries have to compete with other reasons for ICU admissions of patients, such as natural illnesses, advanced chronic illnesses and non-communicable diseases related to lifestyle and diet.     

This often results in many unnecessary deaths, mainly due to shortage of nurses and doctors. In South Africa, not more than 15 percent of nurses are based in rural areas whereas about 44 percent of the country’s population resides in rural areas. December holidays change this picture completely as more people who are migrant workers in urban areas return to their families in rural areas for the festive season. 

As a preventative measure, DENOSA would like to call on all citizens who will be on the road on their holiday destinations to cooperate with law enforcement agencies of the road, be patient, observant, tolerant while on the road, and get the time to rest whenever possible. Losing lives not only increases burden on the country’s already stressed health infrastructure, but also contributes immensely to the country’s economic regress as key components of economic growth, people, get lost on our roads.

DENOSA wishes all South Africans and nurses, many of whom will be hard at work saving lives across the country’s health facilities, a Merry Christmas and a prosperous New Year!

End 

Issued by the Democratic Nursing Organisation of South Africa (DENOSA)

For more information, contact:

Simon Hlungwani, DENOSA President

Mobile: 079 501 4922

 

Or

 

Sibongiseni Delihlazo, DENOSA Communications Manager

Mobile: 079 875 2663

Tel: 012 343 2315

Email: sibongisenid@denosa.org.za

Website: www.denosa.org.za

Facebook: DENOSA National Page

Twitter: @DENOSAORG    

Read more
DENOSA supports Universal Health Coverage Day on 12 December...

Media statement

Thursday, 11 December 2014

The Democratic Nursing Organisation of South Africa (DENOSA) fully supports the world Universal Health Coverage Day tomorrow 12 December, under the theme “Health for all everywhere”, which aims to ensure that all people have access to health care regardless of their financial status.

The success of Universal Health Coverage is solely dependent on a strong and efficiently-run health system of a country.

The concept is based on World Health Organisation’s Constitution of 1948 which declares health a fundamental human right, and commits to ensuring the highest attainable level of health for all. It says the full spectrum of essential, quality health services should be covered including health promotion, prevention and treatment, rehabilitation and palliative care.

While the country is working towards this achievement of Universal Health Coverage (UHC) through NHI which is on pilot sites at selected districts at the moment, DENOSA calls on every stakeholder and manager of all health facilities to ensure that health facilities at least keep to their basics.

Stock-outs of key medicines in key health facilities, high vacancy rates of health workers, lack of sufficient equipment and broken equipment have for far too long become a normal feature in many public health facilities in the country, which goes against the spirit of UHC. Public health facilities cater for 84% of the country’s population, while private sector only caters for 16%.

DENOSA hopes that Operation Phakisa 2 on Ideal Clinics, which was launched on 18 November by President Zuma, will be effective and address these challenges that are being experienced, so that access to quality health is realised.       

From nurses’ perspective, DENOSA fully supports NHI as a means towards UHC, but would like to call on government to spread information about NHI to health workers who are drivers of the country’s health programmes.

An investigation by 12 nurse leaders who are nurse managers and CEOs of hospitals who completed a year-long course on Leadership For Change (LFC) programme, focusing on nursing structure in relation to full implementation of NHI, revealed that many nurses on NHI pilot sites are unaware of NHI and are not sure what role they are to play in it. DENOSA calls on government to ensure that nurses are well-empowered with information relating to NHI development as they are foot-soldiers and the face of the country’s health system.   

End

Issued by the Democratic Nursing Organisation of South Africa (DENOSA)

For more information, contact:

Sibongiseni Delihlazo, DENOSA Communications Manager

Mobile: 079 875 2663

Tel: 012 343 2315

Email: sibongisenid@denosa.org.za

Website: www.denosa.org.za

Facebook: DENOSA National Page

Twitter: @DENOSAORG

Read more
View More

10 REASONS WHY NURSES DESERVE 100% SALARY INCREMENT...

10 REASONS WHY NURSES DESERVE 100% SALARY INCREMENT:

From Ntandane Nyebe, a nurse in Cape Town. 

As the backbone of any healthcare system in the world, it is my honest opinion that nurses deserve proper compensation for the hard work they put in in improving the health of South Africans. After all, nurses are the proverbial Alpha and Omega. The following 10 points are the reasons.    

1. We are short staffed- one person does a work that should have been done by 4 people.

2. We have gone through formal education, we have got degrees etc, we are accountable to a nurses' board, we got to be paid decent salaries like Pharmacists and doctors- YES.

3. The health institutions do not have enough of the unskilled workers e.g. porters and cleaners- Nurses are then forced to work as unkilled workers-on top of their scope of practice, when the need arises.

4. There are many instances where doctors go & do shopping at the malls when they are on call, or simply some institutions have shortage of doctors- when an emergency situation arises- a nurse does a work that was supposed to be done by the doctor to save the client. Same case when there no social workers- nurses must run around doing what was supposed to be done by a social worker.

5. We do a risky job - I've heard of many nurses & docs who died from contagious diseases- especially trauma staff.

6. The governing party admitted in 2011 that there is a dire shortage of nurses in SA, which means nursing is a scarce skill in SA and the last time I checked professionals with scarce skills were getting paid higher salaries in SA.

7. We work under bad conditions- institutions with no proper security, lack of proper equipment etc. But we always try and do our best to improvise for the benefit of the clients.

8. Nurses who go & work overseas they don't go there just for fun or to experience different culture- they leave because they feel they are being overlooked by Government in terms of salary- meanwhile SA loses specialised nurses with experience - Government who cares about its people would try and keep nurses by raising salaries.

9. We deserve better. Our Government can afford to increase our salaries by 100%. There is money in SA- we have seen structural developments in SA & they have been built by companies who have been paid millions and billions.

10. ANC Government promised to increase salary of Nurses when they were in Mangaung in 2012/13. 

I Thank You
End 

 

Read more
View More

Publications

Nursing Update

         
January 2014

Nursing Update is jointly published by the Democratic Nursing Organisation of South Afr... More.

Curationis

         
January

Curationis provides a forum for cutting-edge theories and research models related to th... More

About us

The Democratic Nursing Organisation of South Africa (DENOSA) in its current form was established on 5 December 1996.

The organisation was formed through political consensus after the transition to democracy and was mandated by its membership to represent them and unite the nursing profession. Prior to this, the South African Nursing Council (SANC) and the South African Nurses Association (SANA) were statutory bodies which all nurses had to join. It was also important after the transition to democracy to incorp... Read more